Tia’s News

Tia’s News

So January, like many folkies, was quite a busy month! I had a great time playing for ‘Top Floor Taivers’ at their CD launch in St Andrews in the Square as part of Celtic Connections. There were so many people supporting the night and indeed their new album  ‘A Delicate Game.’  Well worth a listen! I want to say thank you to the band for having me along to play and to everyone who attended the night.

 

At the moment I’m attending an outdoor course so it was back home to build a log store out of Sycamore using an axe, saw, mallet and some twine. It’s rough and at the moment unfinished but thanks to a temporary piece of tarp, we had fire in amongst the heaviest rain we have endured on the course so far. I am learning the basics about maintaining our precious woodlands and how to live with them as part of the John Muir Award. I absolutely love it! A big thank you to ACT for organising the programme and to the Oban Mental Health Team for this hugely beneficial opportunity.

 

While Celtic Connections was coming to the end, I was on my way to play in Michelle Burke’s ’Step into my Parlour.’ This is quite a show with family collections of housekeeping tips, not to mention Michelle and James’s living room coming along for a road trip too! In a car containing Michelle Burke, James Ross, Rick Taylor and a bird cage, how could I not have fun? We had two gigs, starting in Derry and finishing in Manorhamilton. The audiences were great and embraced the parlour and of course Michelle’s pin dropping performances of these songs with my personal favourites being ‘Dan O Hara’ and ‘Gypsies.’ Thanks Michelle, it’s a joy to play in you’re parlour as well as hilarious craic!

     
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'The future of Celtic music' ASHLEY MACISAAC

'Immaculate, 90s-styled boom bap production' THE NATIONAL

'It was like being struck by musical lightning with the rumbling thunder of a deep, angry passion for history and social justice to match.. ..the vanguard of new Gaelic music.' PIPING TODAY 

'The young musician to look out for in Gaelic and Highland music.. a real air of authority.' THE GLASGOW HERALD

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